The Hemingses of Monticello

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Annette Gordon-Reed is a professor of law at New York Law School and a professor of history at Rutgers University. She is the author of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy.

 
The Hemingses of Monticello
An American Family
Annette Gordon-Reed

This epic work tells the story of the Hemings family, whose close blood ties to the third president of America had been systematically expunged from history until very recently.
       Now, historian and legal scholar Annette Gordon-Reed traces the Hemingses from their origins in Virginia in the 1700s to the family’s dispersal after Thomas Jefferson’s death in 1826. It brings to life not only Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson but also their children and Hemings’ siblings, who shared a father with Jefferson’s wife, Martha. The Hemingses of Monticello sets the family’s compelling saga against the backdrop of revolutionary America, Paris on the eve of revolution, 1790s Philadelphia and plantation life at Monticello, Jefferson’s estate in Virginia. Much anticipated, this book promises to be the most detailed history of an American slave family ever written.

"...the magisterial The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family..."
Joyce Carol Oates, Times Literary Supplement, Christmas Roundup 2008

"The Hemingses of Monticello marks the author as one of the most astute, insightful, and forthright historians of this generation."
The New York Review of Books

"[A] commanding and important book."
The New Yorker

"Annette Gordon-Reed offers a brilliantly-evoked, sympathetic portrayal of the African family in Jefferson's life. The result is a remarkable book—the fruits of intensive research and genealogical detective work."
BBC History Magazine

"...the author balances richly drawn individual portraits with insightful historical analysis in this sweeping and learned account."
Good Book Guide

Winner of the 2008 National Book Award for Nonfiction. The Hemingses of Monticello was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the George Washington Book Prize.

Winner of the 2009 Pulitzer History Prize.

October 2009 • Paper • £14.99 • ISBN 978 0 393 33776 1 • 800pp • 156 x 235mm